Section: Features

What’s cooking?

Every weekday around 4 p.m., Peirce Dining Hall’s AVI employees who are on the dinner shift take their lunch break in either Thomas Hall or the Great Hall. Aside from when they are sta- tioned at their various positions, this is the only time most students see the employees. Whether they arrive at 5:30 a.m., like Executive Chef Meagan Worth-Cappell, or stay until midnight, like Sous Chef Michael Hogancamp does after closing a dinner shift, Peirce workers are around more than students may realize. While many students recognize chefs like Worth-Cappell and Hogancamp, there are plenty of faces diners are less likely to see —such as Director of Sustainability John Marsh ’06, who gave the Collegian a complete tour of Peirce. According to Marsh, AVI employs about 80 workers. Working in two shifts that run anywhere between six-and-a-half and eight hours, the AVI employees in green —the culinary workers —and those in black —the non-culinary workers — prepare food and the facilities from the moment they enter until the second they leave. The chefs who wear white even occa- sionally work up to of 18-hour days.

AVI employee Connie Whitcraft feeds carrots into a slicing machine.
AVI employee Connie Whitcraft feeds carrots into a slicing machine.
An expansive view of Peirce’s serving areas gives only half the picture — culinary staff are usually busy at work managing these spots.
An expansive view of Peirce’s serving areas gives only half the picture — culinary staff are usually busy at work managing these spots.
Grounds Person P. Brock Hopkins composts a load of leftovers after a meal; Viola Scott is among those who clean student dishes.
Grounds Person P. Brock Hopkins composts a load of leftovers after a meal; Viola Scott is among those who clean student dishes.

 

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